Bad Credit Report Repair – Why Do It Yourself?

A credit report is a powerful piece of paper. Lenders look at it closely when deciding whether or not to give you a loan or credit card.
Insurance companies will sometimes use it to determine your rates or whether they will issue a policy at all. Employers will access it and use it to determine whether to offer you a job or promotion.
With so much importance placed on your credit report, it is absolutely essential that the information it shows puts you in a good light.

Do it yourself credit repair can save you money!

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Major Threats to Your Credit Score

5 Major Threats to Your Credit Score

A person’s credit score is an extremely important tool, especially if the individual wishes to apply for a loan, or wants to get insurance. Maintaining a good credit score is crucial for maintaining a sound financial picture, since this allows the person to apply for loans without encountering too much hassle. Here are the 5 major threats to one’s credit score.

Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy is like a big black eye on a person’s credit report. It tells prospective creditors that you’re unable to honor your promise to pay back your debts and other financial obligations, from utility bills, credit card charges, child support and more. Although it may take a while for a person to rehabilitate his credit score after bankruptcy, the impact of the bankruptcy though dissipates over time. To restore your credit worthiness, you will need to add new trade lines to your report, as well as take on other forms of credit, like a small appliance loan, so that your credit score will not stagnate.

Late, Or Missing Payments

Credit scores generally monitor how a person manages his or her current and past credit obligations and payments. By incurring a number of missed payments and late payments, your credit scores will certainly fall back hard. The habit of continually missing on payments, or making late payments, gives your creditors an indication that you may do the same in the future, and so this greatly reduces your chances of availing loans from creditors in the future. Always ensure that you never miss bill or loan payments, to maintain a high credit score.

Incurring High Credit Card Balances

Whenever a person incurs high balances in their credit cards, their credit scores go down hard too. The classic case of over-utilization of credit cards happens when the individual runs out their balance, or goes over their credit limits, and only pays the minimum amount each month to avoid further financial problems. Always make it a habit to use your credit cards only when required, and always settle your balances as soon as possible.

Settling With Former Creditors For A Lower Amount

Whenever a person settles his or her former debt with a former creditor at a much lesser amount, this actually does more damage to your credit score. Because you’ve settled with your former creditor for an amount less than what you actually owe them, the creditor eventually reports the remaining balance which you weren’t able to pay, to the credit reporting agencies, and this will get noted in your credit report as a “deficiency balance”. If you have debts with former creditors, make sure that you work out a full settlement with them, and guarantee that what’s accomplished between you and your creditor does not get reported elsewhere.

Not Having a Credit Score

According to credit experts, many people today still don’t have their own credit score. However, if you don’t have a credit history, you certainly won’t have a credit score, and you’ll have a lesser chance of obtaining a loan, insurance or other forms of financing.

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5 Major Threats to Your Credit Score

A person’s credit score is an extremely important tool, especially if the individual wishes to apply for a loan, or wants to get insurance. Maintaining a good credit score is crucial for maintaining a sound financial picture, since this allows the person to apply for loans without encountering too much hassle. Here are the 5 major threats to one’s credit score.

Bankruptcy

A bankruptcy is like a big black eye on a person’s credit report. It tells prospective creditors that you’re unable to honor your promise to pay back your debts and other financial obligations, from utility bills, credit card charges, child support and more. Although it may take a while for a person to rehabilitate his credit score after bankruptcy, the impact of the bankruptcy though dissipates over time. To restore your credit worthiness, you will need to add new trade lines to your report, as well as take on other forms of credit, like a small appliance loan, so that your credit score will not stagnate.

Late, Or Missing Payments

Credit scores generally monitor how a person manages his or her current and past credit obligations and payments. By incurring a number of missed payments and late payments, your credit scores will certainly fall back hard. The habit of continually missing on payments, or making late payments, gives your creditors an indication that you may do the same in the future, and so this greatly reduces your chances of availing loans from creditors in the future. Always ensure that you never miss bill or loan payments, to maintain a high credit score.

Incurring High Credit Card Balances

Whenever a person incurs high balances in their credit cards, their credit scores go down hard too. The classic case of over-utilization of credit cards happens when the individual runs out their balance, or goes over their credit limits, and only pays the minimum amount each month to avoid further financial problems. Always make it a habit to use your credit cards only when required, and always settle your balances as soon as possible.

Settling With Former Creditors For A Lower Amount

Whenever a person settles his or her former debt with a former creditor at a much lesser amount, this actually does more damage to your credit score. Because you’ve settled with your former creditor for an amount less than what you actually owe them, the creditor eventually reports the remaining balance which you weren’t able to pay, to the credit reporting agencies, and this will get noted in your credit report as a “deficiency balance”. If you have debts with former creditors, make sure that you work out a full settlement with them, and guarantee that what’s accomplished between you and your creditor does not get reported elsewhere.

Not Having a Credit Score

According to credit experts, many people today still don’t have their own credit score. However, if you don’t have a credit history, you certainly won’t have a credit score, and you’ll have a lesser chance of obtaining a loan, insurance or other forms of financing.

Click here for more information on credit repair.

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Myths about Credit Scores?

Factors contributing to someone's credit score...
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5 Common Myths About Credit Scores

A person’s credit score is an integral part of his financial life. A lot of agencies and individuals regularly look at your credit score, from banks, credit unions, utility firms, landlords, insurers and even employers. According to a recent survey, half of Americans don’t exactly know how their credit scores are derived, or what factors are used to compute those three vital numbers. Here are five common myths about credit scores.

Myth No. 1 – The Major Credit Bureaus Use Different Formulas In Computing A Credit Score

This is one of the most common myths about credit scores. The truth is that the major credit bureaus, from Experian, Equifax to TransUnion all have a different term for the same score. TransUnion for example, calls it the Empirica, while Experian calls it the Experian/Honest Isaac Risk Model. While these major companies have different names for the credit score, they still use the same formula for coming up with it. While the names used by the major credit companies are essentially the same, lenders often use just one credit report, to analyze your loan application.

Myth No. 2 – To Repair Your Credit Score, Simply Pay-off All Your Debts

The truth is that your credit score will be influenced, and determined by your past credit history, and not by your current amount of debt. While you may be currently quickly paying-off your credit card debts, and settling any other outstanding obligations, your previous history of late or missed payments will still reflect on your score. As the credit experts often say, it takes time to repair your credit score.

See also “The Art of Damaged Credit Repair.”

Myth No. 3 – Closing Old Accounts Helps Boost Your Credit Report

This myth’s nothing but a common delusion. The truth is that closing old accounts won’t affect your credit score, but opening these old accounts will surely hurt your score. Having to many accounts also does damage to your credit score, because your score is usually affected by the difference between the available credit and the credit that’s being used. Shutting-off an old account only helps to make your credit report look young and fresh, but the damage has already been done before.

Myth No. 4 – Loan Shopping Hurts Your Credit Score

Whenever a creditor makes an inquiry about your credit score, the score can drop by as much as five points. Some borrowers often fear that if they shop around for lenders, each time the lender makes an inquiry, their credit score plummets again. The truth is that multiple loan inquiries are generally treated as a single inquiry, provided they come within a 45-day period. It would help if you do your loan rate shopping within the 45-day window.

Myth No. 5 – A Loan Company Can, For A Small Fee, Fix Your Credit Score

Credit bureaus can’t do anything to soften up or alter your credit score, especially if it’s filled with lots of information about you not handling your debts well. The only way to improve or enhance your credit report is by showing that you can handle your debt load well in the future.

To improve your credit score, you need to do four things: Reduce your debt load, Pay your bills on time, Remove existing errors in your credit report, and apply for credit occasionally.

Discover How To Build Back A Good Credit Score & Get Out Of The Debt In The Shortest Time Possible!

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